Idiom Phrase| English Quiz for SBI PO PRE|(Day-38) 15th March 2019

Idiom Phrase Quiz for SBI PO PRE/LIC AAO

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Directions (1-10): In each of the question given below a/an idiom/phrase is given in bold which is then followed by five options which then try to decipher its meaning. Choose the option which gives the correct meaning of the phrases.

Q1. Play it by ear

(a) to be deaf

(b) to act spontaneously

(c) to ignore or neglect

(d) to misinterpret

(e) to express loudly

Q2. Raining cats and dogs

(a) raining heavily

(b) raining lightly

(c) raining intermittently

(d) raining not at all

(e) raining randomly

Q3. Can’t do something to save my life

(a) unable to prevent

(b) unable to provide proper treatment

(c) able to do something completely

(d) unable to do something at all

(e) unable to abstain

Q4. Turn a blind eye

(a) to condemn someone

(b) to overlook

(c) to ignore something wrong

(d) to protest against something right

(e) to become blind after meeting an accident

Q5. Fat chance

(a) big chance

(b) great opportunity

(c) something likely to happen

(d) something unlikely to happen

(e) futile chance

Q6. Pot calling the kettle black

(a) to be complaining always

(b) to be in anger all the time

(c) to be a chauvinist

(d) to judge someone on the basis of their skin color

(e) to criticize someone for the same fault which one himself has

Q7. Head in the clouds

(a) to be under suspicion

(b) to be not well

(c) to be practical

(d) to be impractical

(e) to be alone

Q8. Mad as a hatter

(a) angry

(b) impatient

(c) crazy

(d) impudent

(e) aloof

Q9. Driving me up the wall

(a) to irritate or to annoy

(b) to drive angry

(c) to drive crazy

(d) to become indignant

(e) to confuse

Q10. Call it a day

(a) to start the work

(b) to announce something good

(c) to stop doing the work or to end it

(d) to announce something bad

(e) to mark a day as an important one

Solution

Ans.1.(b)

Exp.“Playing something by ear” means that rather than sticking to a defined plan, you will see how things go and decide on a course of action as you go along.

Example: “What time shall we go shopping?” “Let’s see how the weather looks and play it by ear.”

Ans.2.(a)

Exp. We Brits are known for our obsession with the weather, so we couldn’t omit a rain-related idiom from this list. It’s “raining cats and dogs” when it’s raining particularly heavily. Example: “Listen to that rain!” “It’s raining cats and dogs!”

Ans.3.(d)

Exp.“Can’t do something to save your life” is a hyperbolic way of saying that you’re completely inept at something. It’s typically used in a self-deprecating manner or to indicate reluctance to carry out a task requested of one.

Example: “Don’t pick me – I can’t do to save my life.”

Ans.4.(c)

Exp.To “turn a blind eye” to something means to pretend not to have noticed it.

Example: “She took one of the cookies, but I turned a blind eye.”

Ans.5.(d)

Exp. We use the expression “fat chance” to refer to something that is incredibly unlikely. Bizarrely, and contrary to what one might expect, the related expression “slim chance” means the same thing.

Example: “We might win the Lottery.” “Fat chance.”

Ans.6.(e)

Exp.We use this expression to refer to someone who criticizes someone else, for something they themselves are guilty of.

Example: “You’re greedy.” “Pot calling the kettle black?”

Ans.7.(d)

Exp. Used to describe someone who is not being realistic, the expression “head in the clouds” suggests that the person isn’t grounded in reality and is prone to flights of fancy. The opposite expression would be something like “down to earth”, meaning someone who is practical and realistic.

Example: “He’s not right for this role, he has his head in the clouds.”

Ans.8.(c)

Exp. “Mad as a hatter” refers to someone who is completely crazy. A similar expression is “mad as a March hare”.

Example: “You could ask him, but he’s mad as a hatter.”

Ans.9.(a)

Exp. This expression is used when something (or someone) is causing extreme exasperation and annoyance. A similar expression meaning the same thing is “driving me round the bend”.

Example: “That constant drilling noise is driving me up the wall.”

Ans.10.(c)

Exp. This means to stop doing something for the day, for example work, either temporarily or to give it up completely.

Example: “I can’t concentrate – let’s call it a day.”

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