SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz – 64

SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz

English Language is a part of almost all major competitive exams in the country and is perhaps the most scoring section also. Aspirants who regularly practice questions have a good chance of scoring well in the English Language Section. So here we are providing you with the SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz to help you prepare better. This SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz includes all of the most recent pattern-based questions, as well as Previous Year’s Questions. This SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz is available to you at no cost. Candidates will be provided with a detailed explanation of each question in this SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz. Candidates must practice this SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz to achieve a good score in the English Language Section.

Directions (1 – 6): Read the following passage carefully and certain words in the passage are printed in bold letters to help you locate them easily while answering some of these questions.

The Ministry of Home Affairs recently posted the draft of a bill aimed at regulating the acquisition and use of geospatial information pertaining to India. In brief, the provisions of the draft Geospatial Information Regulation Bill, 2016, make it illegal to acquire and even maintain previously acquired Indian geospatial data without applying for and receiving a license from an authority that is to be created for this purpose. The remit of this authority, as per the draft, is, first, to conduct “sensitivity checks” on the geospatial information being used, and, second, to “screen” the “credentials” of both end users and end applications. Media reports have tended to focus on the aspect of the bill that talks about heavy penalties for misrepresenting the boundaries of India, but let us instead focus on the important aspects that pertain to the data ecosystem. The bill, as written, raises some questions.

What happens if the data need an update? The draft bill’s definition of geospatial information has a wide remit. It covers information that we think of as relatively stable but also talks about “graphical or digital data depicting… man-made physical features”. Geospatial information, especially when so widely defined, keeps changing. In Delhi, for example, we see roads being modified, overpasses being constructed, temporary and permanent diversions being created almost on a daily basis. So, what happens when the data change?

Consider the illustrative, though not earthshakingly important, case of your favourite restaurant discovery app: will it have to apply for a new licence every time a new restaurant opens (or closes) in Hauz Khas Village? Effectively it will have to, since the draft bill proposes that only data that bear the watermark of the vetting authority be used for display. Changing the name of a restaurant in such data would amount to tampering with watermarked data. Not propagating updates till security clearance is released may affect the business model of businesses premised on providing up-to-date information. The bill promises a three-month turnaround on all clearances. This might not be quick enough, even if it was feasible, which leads us to the next question.

Do we have the bandwidth to handle all applications for this usage inside and outside India? It is hard to estimate how many different non-governmental services inside and outside India are currently using Indian geospatial data, but we can safely say that there are a large number with significant impact. Add to these all those 17-year-olds dreaming of start-up glory who are mashing Google maps into their soon-to-be-world-dominating app. A government regulator that is yet to be set up will need hundreds of experts who can vet terabytes of data from each applicant.

The logistics of getting these data across to the vetting authority alone boggles the mind, forget about the logistics of hiring and training these hundreds of experts. Unless this bill, on becoming an act, manages to single-handedly kill the innovation ecosystem that depends on geospatial data, the number of requests will keep going up. And all these people will be “acquiring” and wanting to propagate updates. Which further leads us to the next question.

Does every single end user of such data also need a licence? Large organisations like Google, which are acquiring and making geospatial data available through their application programming interfaces (APIs), are in some sense at the lowest level of an application stack which could potentially have several layers (and probably already has). Application A buys a service that uses geospatial data from application B that has in turn bought it from provider C who has licensed it from organisation D. Or, in a more complex turn of events, app A mashes up data from services B, C and D which in turn have bought their data from E, F and G and, guess what, F and G have some kind of data-sharing agreement. How will A get its data acquisition vetted?

The complexity of the ecosystem and the trajectories such data can take are only limited by the imagination of developers and service creators working on different kinds of problems in a host of different sectors. And, in fact, typically such complexity emerges organically as different actors in the innovation ecosystem work to create new efficiencies or leverage existing ones, and so it is something to be encouraged. To satisfactorily “vet” the complex mishmashes of data that are bound to emerge over time will be a challenging task; in fact some of the questions raised in vetting involved data provenance patterns may almost be research-level questions. All this will further burden the vetting authority and stretch its capabilities.

  1. What is the main purpose of the author to write the above passage?

(a) To explain the important aspects that related to the complex network system.

(b) To explain the disadvantages associated with the bill.

(c) To describe the importance of the bill for internal security of the country.

(d) To throw light on the penalty for misrepresenting the boundaries of India.

(e) None of these

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp.  It’s given in the first paragraph that ‘’ ……. but let us instead focus on the important aspects that pertain to the data ecosystem’. Hence (a) is the correct option.

  1. Which of the following option(s) is/are TRUE according to the given passage?

(i) Geospatial Information Regulation Bill makes it illegal to access Indian geospatial data.

(ii) Nod from the government will be needed before updating graphical or digital data.

(iii) Geospatial information is quite passive.

(a) Only (i)

(b) Only (ii)

(c) Only (iii)

(d) Both (i) and (ii)

(e) Both (i) and (iii)

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp.  From the first and third paragraphs, we can conclude that (i)and (ii) are true. Now it is given in the fourth paragraph that ‘Geospatial information, especially when so widely defined, keeps changing’. Hence, (iii) is false. Hence (d) is the correct option.

  1. Which of following option(s) is/are NOT TRUE according to the given passage?

(i) There are a large number of users of Indian geospatial data.

(ii) A regulating authority has been set up for issuing the license for the usage of Indian geospatial data.

(iii) With the introduction of the new bill it will become difficult for various service providers to provide up-to-date information.

(a) Only (i)

(b) Only (ii)

(c) Both (i) and (ii)

(d) All are true

(e) None is true

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp.  It is given in the fourth paragraph that ‘A government regulator that is yet to be set up….’ Hence, (b) is the correct option.

  1. According to the given passage, what is the main provision of the Information Regulation Bill?

(a) It introduces heavy penalties for misrepresenting the boundaries of India.

(b) It makes it difficult for foreign companies like Google to acquire Indian geospatial data.

(c) It makes it mandatory to apply for and receive a license from a proposed authority to acquire and even maintain Indian geospatial data.

(d) Not given in the passage.

(e) None of these.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. From the first paragraph, we can conclude that (c) is the correct option.

  1.  Which of the following option(s) are going to be burdensome for the scrutinizing authority?

(a) To satisfactorily examine the complex mess of data that is bound to emerge over time.

(b) To clear the license within three-months.

(c) To estimate the number of non-governmental services inside and outside India is currently using Indian geospatial data.

(d) Not given in the passage

(e) Other than those given in the options.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp.  It is given in the last paragraph that ‘To satisfactorily “vet” the complex mishmashes of data that are bound to emerge over time will be a challenging task’. Hence, (a) is the correct option

  1. On the basis of your reading, suggest a suitable title for the passage.

(a) Indian geospatial data

(b) License Raj

(c) Sensitivity Checks

(d) Key to internal security

(e) A license to kill innovation

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp.  A license to kill innovation’ is the apt title.

Directions (7–10): Which of the words/phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below should replace the words/phrases given in bold in the following sentences to make it meaningful and grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is and ‘No correction is required’, mark (e) as the answer.

  1. Merely stressing the need for a peaceful fortitude to the conflict is not enough. Japan, Washington’s important regional associate, would view with no less dismay any potential threat to stability in its neighbourhood. American air strikes in Syria last week have raised very valid interests about their legitimacy under international law.

(a) determination, friend, fear, malices

(b) hesitation, confederate, dread, affairs

(c) resolution, ally, consternation, concerns

(d) perseverance, foe, dread, worries

(e) No improvement required

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. Consternation means a feeling of anxiety or dismay, typically at something unexpected. Confederate means supporter. Malice means ill will.

  1. We live in a very complex world in which the media is at the forefront of public interest. Social media, yet another unruly horse, with its stretch, impacts the lives of millions. Populism is at its height. The taste of civilised discourse have vanished. Economic interests sometimes drive public discourse. News is occasionally mitigated.

(a) discourse, outreach, contours, motivated

(b) talk, back, forms, driven

(c) shear, exceed, outlines, encouraged

(d) discussion, outwit, delineates, languorous

(e) No improvement required

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp. Outwit means deceive by greater ingenuity. Languorous means certain kind of mood. Contours means bounding the shape or form of something.

  1. To address the “insider” threat to information and information systems, an admission security policy is considerably recommended as an organisational bill. However, having a policy in place does not necessarily insist information security.

(a)Intelligence, habitually, part, assure

(b)Information, frequently, measure, guarantee

(c)Admonition, ordinarily, goal, certify

(d)Instruction, commonly, clause, answer

(e)No correction required.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. Admonition means a firm warning or reprimand. Considerably means by a notably large amount or to a notably large extent; greatly.

  1. The “season” is yet to officially initiate but already teams of mountaineers are out in the Mt. Everest region, training and fitting for a tender on what continues to be the “ultimate” in the nagging sport.

(a)Inaugurate, conforming, declaration, pressing

(b)Launch, accommodating, recourse, yielding

(c)Commence, acclimatizing, bid, demanding

(d)Set about, habituating, requisition, domineering

(e)No correction required.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. Acclimatizing means become accustomed to a new climate or new conditions; adjust. Bid means make an effort or attempt to achieve. Requisition means an official order laying claim to the use of property or materials. Domineering means asserting one’s will over another in an arrogant way.

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