SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz – 23

SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz

Aspirants have a strong possibility of scoring well in the English Language section if they practice quality questions on a regular basis. This section takes the least amount of time if the practice is done every day in a dedicated manner. In this article, we have come up with the SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz to help you prepare better. Candidates will be provided with a detailed explanation for each question in this SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz. This SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz includes a variety of questions ranging in difficulty from easy to tough. This SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz is totally FREE. This SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz has important English Language Questions and Answers that will help you improve your exam score. Aspirants must practice this SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz in order to be able to answer questions quickly and efficiently in upcoming exams.

Directions (1-5): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

The Prime Minister’s recent trip to Nigeria, the first bilateral prime ministerial visit to Africa since Jawaharlal Nehru’s 45 years ago, recalls a long neglected Indian obligation. “It is up to Asia to help Africa to the best of her ability,” Nehru told the Bandung Conference in 1955, “because we are sister continents”. “The Prime Minister’s proposed strategic partnership with African nations might at last make good that 52-year old promise and also, perhaps, challenge China’s expedient diplomacy.

In the intervening years, the West’s sanctimonious boycott of many African regimes – after nearly a century of extreme colonial exploitation – left the continent in the grip of oppressive rulers looking for new political sponsors, arms-sellers and trading partners. Not only was it an abdication of the developed world’s responsibility to the world’s least developed region, sanctions actually compounded the sufferings of poorer Africans. The Darfur killings continue and there is no mellowing of Robert Mugabe’s repression in Zimbabwe.

Abandoned by the West Africa looked elsewhere. Beijing filled the vacuum by eagerly embracing dangerous and unsavoury regimes in its search for oil and other minerals. China demonstrated its influence by playing host to 48 out of 53 African leaders a year ago in a jamboree that was historic as well as historical. Historic because China has succeeded in becoming the pre-eminent outside power in Africa and its second biggest trading partner. Historical because modern Chinese diplomacy draws on the Middle kingdom’s ancient formula; the tribute system. It was how the son of Heaven brought those nations whom the Celestial Empire called “barbarians’ into his imperial trading and, through it, cultural and political system.

Contemporary China’s economic penetration of Africa also heralds a new era of cultural and political ties though the Chinese foreign ministry repeatedly assured the world that “our cooperation is not designed to be against or preclude any third party.” This is untrue in a world of finite resources. Once the Chinese are established in a country, no one else gets a foothold. Myanmar, where India failed to obtain the desired gas concessions, is a prime example. Aware that the hunt for energy is a zero-sum game, China’s leadership courts African leaders with regular visits and substantial grants.

 

After decades of neglect – Vajpayee’s Africa visit over a decade ago was to attend a Commonwealth Summit– India will have to move cautiously but quickly if it is to break China’s monopoly. Along with investing in Africa’s human capital, China has outlined a strategic investment plan to build three to five trade economic cooperation zones in Africa by 2009 to boost trade, which is expected to tap $40 billion this year. That could double to $30 billion by 2010 on the back of an insatiable demand for natural resources to feed China’s booming economy.

  1. What was Jawaharlal Nehru’s consideration for helping African nations?

(a) The people in the continent were extremely backward

(b) The Bandung Conference was held in African Continent

(c) African Continent is emotionally related to Asian Continent

(d) Nehru had promised the British rulers to help Africa after independence

(e) The West had exploited African people

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. “It is up to Asia to help Africa to the best of her ability “Nehru told the Bandung conference in 1955, “because we are sister continents.” These statements explain that African continent is emotionally related to Asian continent.

  1. The example of Myanmar given by the author proves

(a) that when China patronizes a country it does not allow other nations to enter

(b) India’s foresight to feed its growing hunger for energy

(c) Myanmar’s political acumen to have symbiosis with China

(d) that a country’s political wisdom does not necessarily establish economic stability

(e) None of these

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp.  Once the Chinese are established in a country, no one else gets a foothold. Mayanmar, where India failed to obtain the desired gas concessions, is a prime example. These lines explain China’s monopoly

  1. Which of the following is the author’s suggestion to India to break the Chinese monopoly?

(a) Move away cautiously but quickly from the African nations

(b) Arrange P. M.'s regular visits to African countries

(c) Outline a strategic plan of investment in the African countries

(d) Plan for an increased economic help to African countries

(e) None of these

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp.  None of the answer choices are author’s suggestion to India to break the Chinese monopoly. In the passage, the author only says that India will have to move cautiously but quickly if it is to break Chinese monopoly.

 

  1. From the contents of the passage, it can be inferred that the author’s views are

(a) in favour of India gaining an edge over China

(b) against India’s entering into a competition with China

(c) in favour of not making any investment in African countries

(d) appreciate of oppressive and barbaric African rulers

(e) None of these

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp.  Everywhere in the passage we find author favours India gaining an edge over China. Author throughout the passage is highlighting China’s own perspective while they are helping the African’s.

  1. The author considers the claims of the Chinese Foreign Ministry regarding third party as

(a) just and worthy of trust

(b) true but slightly exaggerated

(c) too exorbitant to be true

(d) an underestimate of the quality and quantity of their help

(e) None of these

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp.  According to the passage the Chinese foreign ministry repeatedly assured the world that “our co-operation is not designed to be against or preclude any third party”. None of the answer choices matches author ’s consideration because the claims of China’s foreign ministry are totally untrue

Directions (6-10): Five statements are given below, labelled (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e). Among these, four statements are in logical order and form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the option that does not fit into the theme of the passage/paragraph.

  1. (a) This query comes from a position where news is almost omnipresent and hence context is the new requirement.

(b) While conceding space for some news stories that require verification and fact-checking, I was asked whether it is possible to do a clinical analysis of the daily copy, keeping in view the readers’ requirements, and find out what was redundant.

(c) In this context, I am seeking responses from the readers about what news they get before they get their newspaper in the morning.

(d) In the age of instant news, it seems that a lot of information that one reads in the newspaper in the morning has already been read, seen, or heard elsewhere.

(e) If this is indeed possible, would it be beneficial to skew more towards views than news in the daily newspaper?

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. The paragraph is about the lost charm of newspapers due to technological advancement and the urgent need of revival in this particular field. It can be viewed in the sequence of DBEA which forms the coherent paragraph. Option (c) doesn’t fit in this sequence and hence is the correct choice of elimination.

  1. (a) Two things set aside India’s digital spaces from that of major powers such as the United States and China: design and density.

(b) This would involve the development of software designed to intrude, intercept and exploit digital networks.

(c) This is not a design flaw, but simply reflects the popularity of social media platforms and the lack of any serious effort by the Indian government to restrict the flow of data.

(d) India is a net information exporter.

(e) Its information highways point west, carrying with them the data of millions of Indians.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. ADEC forms a coherent paragraph as it talks about India’s rise in information technology and social media platforms and the possible threat related to the data sharing. Among the given options, only option (b) has no connection with any of the other sentences of the paragraph as it is referring towards the development of certain software which is not mentioned in any other options. Hence (b) is the correct choice.

  1. (a) The Economist said, in an article on the Tata-Mistry fight, that in India, “good corporate governance” was simply a euphemism for “not crooked”.

(b) By that logic, both the Tata Group and Infosys, and for that matter all the protagonists in the high-profile spats in these groups are exemplars of “good corporate governance”.

(c) But that hasn’t stopped investors from voting with their feet on how they viewed these tiffs.

(d) Clearly, when it comes to fighting for “principles”, timing is as important as the issues one is fighting for.

(e) This is because of the manner in which these have been raised.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp. ABCD forms a coherent paragraph as it talks about the good corporate governance issues of Tata Group and Infosys. Read the sentence given in option (e) which brings out some reason which has no connection with any other sentences of the paragraph. Hence (e) is the correct choice.

  1. (a) The strengthening of the Election Commission and the deployment of Central paramilitary forces have, to a large degree, overcome this legitimation crisis.

(b) Legitimacy obtains when people justifiably feel that enough is being done by the state to deliver what they need and want.

(c)It is absent when the gap widens between people’s own expectations and the actual benefits received by them.

(d) All democracies depend for their survival on public approval and consent.

(e) To be sure, the Indian state periodically suffers from an acute crisis of legitimacy (legitimation crisis).

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp. EDBC forms a coherent paragraph as it talks about the crisis of legitimacy. Except option (a), all other options talk about the prospects of the legitimacy and the sufferings related to its crisis. Option (a) points out the important step or measure that helped in overcoming this crisis. Hence it can be easily eliminated from this particular paragraph. Hence (a) is the correct choice.

  1. (a) Each time an Indian city is hit by a major urban crisis, we hear exasperated queries about why our cities are so dysfunctional.

(b) For example, ideas have often circulated freely across the globe often obscuring true origins.

(c) Our cities have a weak and fragmented institutional architecture in which multiple agencies with different bosses pull the strings of city administration.

(d) While there are multiple reasons for India’s urban woes, one of the underlying problems is the absence of powerful and politically accountable leadership in the city.

(e) Understandably, the most touted urban governance reform is that of having a directly elected Mayor.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. The paragraph is about the India’s urban crisis and the reasons behind such woes. ADCE forms a coherent paragraph whereas option (b) has no role to play in this particular paragraph. It talks about some ideas which fail to connect with any other sentences among the given options. Hence (b) is the correct choice.

 

 

 

 

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