SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz – 24

SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz

English Language plays a very crucial role in every competitive examination. With consistent practice, candidates can ace this section in examination. In this article, we bring to you SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz to boost your preparation. This SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz contains various types of questions ranging from easy to difficult level. This SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz is absolutely FREE. Candidates will be provided with a detailed explanation of each question in this SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz. In order to be able to answer questions quickly and efficiently in upcoming exams, aspirants must practice this SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz.

Directions (1-5): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in bold to help you locate them, while answering some of the questions.

Enterprises in the throes of discovery have an aura of magic around them. In the world of software this becomes many-splendored with certain joie de vivre, quite distinct from what obtains elsewhere: a sense of wonderment, surprise and eventual delight; a coming within reach of power and profits; possibly through a little tweak in technology with a touch of novelty, opening up vistas that had always seemed so near yet so far. In professional management terms, this waving of the wizard’s wand, as it were, is nothing more than an effective recovery of strategy from a technological paradigm. This book is about exploring the journey from rules and norms to solutions, specific solutions prized out of the armored covers of sector-specific industrial structures and often resources determined mindsets that Indian software’ firms seems to have mastered. Originality is the fountainhead of such a strategy. It then progresses into the realms of the economics of innovation to give itself a solid foundation from where it becomes possible to retrieve a new language of strategy and of innovation. In this high- natural yet dynamic world, the profit motive, backed by ingenuity, lend support to many of the arguments that evolve in this flow of events. The Indian software experience is a unique demonstration of how this process – the coalescing of the economics of surprise and novelty and the economics of knowledge works. This forms the basics of the strategy theory.

There are several grand theories of even grander traditions: the industrial organization approach, including several kinds of structure-conduct performance assertions and game theoretic models, evolutionary theories and corresponding case’ studies, resource-based approaches or several intermediate variants of competency based ideas that provide us with a rich yet incomplete landscape. This landscape is perhaps oblivious of certain traditions provided by theory; the rich repertoire bequeathed by Marshall and Shackle is a case in point, as they are immensely rewarding. Each important traditions or theory has made global assertions and has proved to be prescriptive or normative. Some authors have looked back at Marshall and a handful at Shackle. Fewer still reconsidered certain rich -traditions of thinking on strategy. This book does not attempt to issue prescriptive or normative guidelines purely because, the global canvass is too large and often beyond the capacity of intelligent comprehension. A strategist acts on a local scale following what Simon has generally observed. Pragmatism emerges as an important guide-and achieving the surprise element is above all, the key to definitive strategy. While this strategy evolves from governance, it also influences governance at every stage. Handicapped by a paucity of resources, the strategist must dovetail the two to increase immensely the scope of governance not only over what the incumbent possesses, but also over a much larger group of firms not under its direct control. This need not necessarily be explained by another grand theory, with globally prescriptive assertions or powers of predictions. Surprise must stand beyond predictability. ‘It must govern to earn windfall profit. Strategy thus cannot be prescribed; it would comprise piecemeal engineering. This is what this book explains.

  1. The locale of the phrase “acting on a local scale” as used in the passage above refers to:

(a) Cognitively delimited space

(b) Geographically delimited space

(c) Temporally delimited space

(d) Both (a) and (b)

(e) None of the above

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. Refer the second paragraph of the passage, “This book does not attempt to issue prescriptive or normative guidelines purely because, the global canvass is too large and often beyond the capacity of intelligent comprehension. A strategist acts on a local scale following what Simon has generally observed.” Hence option (b) is correct.

  1. The idea of a ‘magic’ as used in the passage refers to:

(a) Irrationality and blind belief

(b) A sense of wonder at imagination unbridled by any governance whatsoever

(c) A sense of wonder at the discovery of a grand theory

(d) Both (b) and (c)

(e) None of the above

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp. Refer ‘wonderment’, ‘delight’, ‘novelty’, etc. in the second sentence of the first paragraph of the passage. Hence none of the given options is correct in the context of the passage

  1. According to the author, the several extant strands of strategy literature such as the Industrial Organization approach provide an incomplete landscape because:

(a) They fail to take account of contributions of Marshall and Shackle

(b) It is normative in nature

(c) The vastly rich and unfolding reality is beyond the capacity of human comprehension

(d) It acts on a local scale.

(e) None of the above.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. Refer the second paragraph of the passage, “This book does not attempt to issue prescriptive or normative guidelines purely because, the global canvass is too large and often beyond the capacity of intelligent comprehension.” Hence option (c) is correct.

  1. Which of the following follows from the passage?

(a) Indian software firms have excelled in providing specific solutions

(b) Indian software firms have been remarkable technology innovators

(c) Indian software firms have benefited from low priced manpower, with adequate programming skills

(d) Indian software firms have failed in providing innovative solutions.

(e) None of the above

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp. Refer the first paragraph of the passage, “This book is about exploring the journey from rules and norms to solutions, specific solutions prized out of the armored covers of sector-specific industrial structures and often resources determined mindsets that Indian software’ firms seems to have mastered.” Hence option (a) is correct.

  1. From the passage which would be an adequate characterization of the author?

(a) Positivist

(b) Pragmatist

(c) Empiricist

(d) Cynical

(e) Hypocrite

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. The author’s approach is pragmatic or practical rather than empirical i.e. based on experiment.

Directions (6 – 10): In each of the questions given below a sentence is given which is then divided into five parts out of which last part is correct. There are errors in three out of four remaining parts and therefore only one of the parts (other than the bold one) is correct. You must choose the grammatically correct part as your answer.

  1. A music and dance show have been (A)/ organized to raised (B)/ funds for the orphanage at (C)/ the first Saturday (D)/ of next month. (E)

(a) A
(b) B
(c) C
(d) D
(e) E

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp. Phrase (D) is correct while others are incorrect.

Phrase (A): ‘has’ will be used in place of ‘have’ and ‘music and dance’ represents singular number.

Phrase (B): ‘raise’ will be the correct use in place of ‘raised’ as ‘to raise’ is an infinitive (‘to + V1’) in which we use first form of verb with ‘to’.

Phrase (C): ‘on’ will be used in place of ‘at’ as preposition ‘on’ is used to specify ‘days’ and ‘dates’.

  1. The blind’s life (A)/ are really very miserable (B)/ because they can’t see (C)/ what is happening (D)/ around them. (E)

(a) A
(b) B
(c) C
(d) D
(e) E

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. All phrases except phrase (C) are incorrect.

Phrase (A): Use “the life of the blind” in place of “The blind’s life” because in the case of  The+ Adjective in plural Noun scenario we don’t use s’ as we use the preposition ‘of’ to denote the relationship.

Phrase (B): Replace ‘are’ with ‘is’ as the subject of the sentence ‘life’ is singular.

Phrase (D): Replace ‘happens’ in place of ‘is happening’ as the sentence is talking about a ‘general truth’, for which simple present tense is used.

  1. Each of the student (A)/ whom I have chose to take part (B)/ in the cultural programmes to be performed (C)/ in the City Hall, are (D)/ up to the mark.(E)

(a) A
(b) B
(c) C
(d) D
(e) E

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. Only Phrase (C) is correct.

Phrase (A): ‘students’ will be used in place of ‘student’ as after ‘each of’ or ‘one of’, we use plural noun.

Phrase (B): ‘chosen’ is the correct use in place of ‘chose’ as past participle of verb is used after ‘has/ have/had’.

Phrase (D): Use ‘is’ in place of ‘are’ as after ‘each of’ we always use a singular verb.

  1. The teachers face the (A)/ same problems in its (B)/ day to day lives as do (C)/ the ordinary man (D)/ of our society. (E)

(a) A
(b) B
(c) C
(d) D
(e) E

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp. Only phrase (A) is correct.

Phrase (B): ‘their’ is the correct use in place of ‘its’ as the subject of the sentence ‘teachers’ is plural.

Phrase (C): Use ‘does’ in place of ‘do’ as the subject ‘an ordinary man’ is a 3rd person singular number.

Phrase (D): ‘an’ is the correct use in place of ‘the’ as ‘an’ is used before vowel ‘ordinary’.

  1. While schooling is about (A)/ to discipline cadres into (B)/ certain behaviours and response,(C)/  education is for (D)/ building competence. (E)

(a) A
(b) B
(c) C
(d) D
(e) E

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

 

3

Leave a Reply