SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz – 8

SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz – 8

English Language is a part of almost all major competitive exams in the country and is perhaps the most scoring section also. Aspirants who regularly practice questions have a good chance of scoring well in the English Language Section. So here we are providing you with the SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz to help you prepare better. This SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz includes all of the most recent pattern-based questions, as well as Previous Year Questions. This SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz is available to you at no cost. Candidates will be provided with a detailed explanation of each question in this SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz. Candidates must practice this SBI Clerk Pre-English Language Quiz to achieve a good score in the English Language Section.

Directions (1-5): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

This year’s UNDP Human Development Report doesn’t, as usual, present a pretty picture so far as India is concerned. India ranks 126 in the human development index (HDI) among 177 countries. Placed in the lower half of ‘medium human development’ countries, India is 10 places ahead of Bangladesh and only three ahead of Myanmar.

Though it is India’s abysmal rank that grabs one’s attention — particularly in the context of the euphoria about India’s economic growth — the UNDP report is best used to chart the performance of the state. The HDI, brainchild of economist Mahbubul Haq, was developed to track human welfare as opposed to material wealth which is measured by GDP. It is a measure based on three dimensions of human development — life expectancy, literacy and standard of living. India’s showing on all three counts is far from inspiring. Even if India is compared to developing countries in Asia it fares poorly. Indonesia, for example, is streets ahead with an adult literacy rate of 90 per cent as compared to 61 per cent in India; Indonesia’s life expectancy is 67.2 to India’s 63.6; and the population who survive on $1 a day is 7.5 per cent in Indonesia as opposed to 34.7 per cent in India. There are several other countries in the region such as Thailand, Iran and Vietnam that are way ahead of India on all these indices.

The uninspiring figures for India must be seen in the light of state spending on health and education. The health expenditure of the state was 1.2 per cent of GDP, which is at par with Indonesia and Bangladesh, but far lower than medium-development countries such as China or Vietnam. On the education front, the public spending on education in India at 3.3 per cent of GDP is higher than that in Indonesia, but lower than other developing countries like Mexico. It is not all gloom and doom for India though. India’s dependence on foreign aid has come down over the last 15 years. Foreign development assistance now stands at 0.1 per cent of GDP as compared to 0.4 per cent in 1990. The figures for China and Vietnam stand at 0.1 and 4 per cent respectively. India does not fare too badly either on the Gini index, which measures inequality on a scale where 0 represents perfect equality and 100 perfect inequality. India scores 32.5 on the Gini which compares favourably with China’s 44.7 and Indonesia’s 37.0.

The picture that emerges is that of an Indian state that channels inadequate funds into health and education, which is reflected in India’s poor showing on the HDI. A few obvious conclusions can be drawn from this.

One, India’s aspirations of becoming a global power must be taken with more than a pinch of salt. Two, the Indian state hasn’t got its priorities right. This can be seen from government spending on defense, which is nearly the same as that on education and more than double that on health. Three, even when government does allocate funds there is no guarantee that it reaches the intended beneficiaries. As Rajiv Gandhi once remarked, out of every rupee spent on development only 17 paise actually reached its target.

The failure of the state machinery in India is an old story. But it touches a different chord at a time when there are breathless predictions about India, along with China, becoming the economic powerhouse of the world. It is apparent that the benefits of a consistently high level of growth do not automatically trickle down to the poor and translate into a better quality of life. But what does one do to ensure that education and health benefits percolate down to the most needy?

There are some who would like to believe that education and health should be left in private hands. This is a reflection of the increasing antipathy among certain sections towards the state. It also reflects a belief that India’s economic boom has happened despite the state. There could well be some truth in that. But it still begs the question as to why private players would take up projects such as health care and education for the poor where there is little or no chance of profit. There is no escaping the fact that education and health, along with law and order, remain responsibilities of the state.

  1. Why is the author against privatisation of health and education

services?

(a)because private sector lacks the expertise and funds required to deal

with these areas

(b)because government will have no major job left in such a case

(c)because private sector cannot deliver in remote areas in these fields

(d)because private sector will not be keen to take up these areas

(e)None of these

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp. See last para.

Directions (2-3): Choose the word which is the same in meaning as the word given in bold as used in the passage.

2.OBVIOUS

(a) determined

(b) clear

(c) solid

(d) awkward

(e) basic

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. OBVIOUS means easily perceived or understood. So, clear is the word which is similar in meaning to it.

  1. PERCOLATE

(a) range

(b) raise

(c) distribute

(d) permeate

(e) sustain

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp. PERCOLATE means spread gradually through an area or group of

people. So, permeate is the word which is similar in meaning to it.

Direction (4-5): Choose the word which is the opposite in meaning of the word given in  bold as used in the passage.

  1. ABYSMAL

(a) rapid

(b) deserving

(c) graceful

(d) terrible

(e) upgrade

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. ABYSMAL means extremely bad. So, Graceful is the word which is opposite in meaning to it.

5.EUPHORIA

(a) degeneration

(b) misery

(c) indignation

(d) waiver

(e) upheaval

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp.  EUPHORIA means a feeling or state of intense excitement and happiness. So, misery is the word which is opposite in meaning to it.

Direction (6-10): In the questions given below, there is a sentence in which one part is given in bold. The part given in bold may or may not be grammatically correct. Choose the best alternative among the four given which can replace the part in bold to make the sentence grammatically correct. If the part given in bold is already correct and does not require any replacement, choose option (e), i.e. “No replacement required” as your answer.

  1. Media baron Subhash Chandra’s Essel Group has sealed a deal with private equity fund Invesco Oppenheimer Developing Markets Fund, who will pick up 11% stakein Zee Entertainment Enterprises Ltd.

(a) whom will pick up 11% stake

(b) them will pick up 11% stake

(c) which will pick up 11% stake

(d) whose will pick up 11% stake

(e) No replacement required

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. In the given highlighted part, the use of ‘Who’ is incorrect because ‘Who’ refer to people. ‘That’ and ‘Which’ refer to groups or things. Hence, the correct answer choice would be option (c)

  1. A second attempt at disinvestment of Air Indiais likely to see strongest interestfrom private players, including participation from leading global airlines such as those from the Gulf, according to aviation consulting firm CAPA.

(a) is like to see strongest interest

(b) is likely to see strong interest

(c) was likely to see stronger interest

(d) is about to see stronger interest

(e) No replacement required

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. The use of superlative adjective in the highlighted phrase is incorrect because we use a superlative adjective to describe the extreme quality of one thing in a group of things but that is not the case here. Hence, the most appropriate alternative for the given phrase is option (b)

  1. For the first time ever, the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) has been actively examining the feasibilityof allowing derivatives contracts based on intangibles such as weather or freight in the Indian commodity segment.

(a) is actively examined the feasibility

(b) had been actively examining the feasibility

(c) has actively examine the feasibility

(d) is actively examining the feasibility

(e) No replacement required

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp. The use of present perfect continuous tense in the highlighted phrase is incorrect because taking cue from the starter of the sentence in which it is stated that ‘For the first time ever’ and present perfect continuous tense is used to denote the action which started in past is still in continuation. The most appropriate replacement for the given phrase is option (d) which will make the given sentence grammatically correct.

  1. The Tea Board has, in-principle, accepted the recommendations submitted by a teamof IIM Bangalore professors to recast the present pan India e-auction system.

(a) recommendations have been submitted by a team

(b) recommendations that had submitted by a team

(c) recommendations submit by a team

(d) recommendations submitting by a team

(e) No replacement required

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp. There is no grammatical error in the highlighted phrase. Hence, the correct answer choice would be option (e)

  1. President Donald Trump denied any racist “strategy” about a string of verbal attackon African-Americans, but found himself being accused of hate by a heckler at a high-profile speech.

(a) followed a string of verbal attack

(b) behind a string of verbal attacks

(c) regarding a string of verbal attack

(d) following a string of verbal attack

(e) No replacement required

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. The use of ‘about’ in the highlighted phrase is incorrect, also instead of ‘attack’ it should be ‘attacks’ because of the use of ‘string’ in the given phrase. The most appropriate replacement for the given phrase will be option (b) which will make the given sentence grammatically correct.

 

 

 

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