SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz – 65

SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz

English Language plays a very crucial role in every competitive examination. With consistent practice, candidates can ace this section in examination. In this article, we bring to you SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz to boost your preparation. This SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz contains various types of questions ranging from easy to difficult level. This SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz is absolutely FREE. Candidates will be provided with a detailed explanation of each question in this SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz. In order to be able to answer questions quickly and efficiently in upcoming exams, aspirants must practice this SBI PO Prelims English Language Quiz.

Directions (1-5): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

A lot of the media discussion on the global economy nowadays is based on the notion of the “new normal” or “new mediocre”—the phenomenon of slowing, stagnating or negative economic growth across most of the world. News in terms of employment generation is even worse, with hardly any creation of good quality jobs and growing material insecurity for the bulk of the people. All sorts of explanations are being proffered for this state of affairs, from technological progress, to slower population growth, to insufficient investment because of shifts in relative prices of capital and labour, to “balance sheet recessions” created by the private debt overhang in many economies, to contractionary fiscal stances of governments that are also excessively indebted.

Yet, these arguments that treat economic processes as the inevitable results of some forces outside the system that follow their own logic and are beyond social intervention are hugely misplaced. Most of all, they let economic policies off the hook, and this is massively important because the possibility of alternative strategies that would not result in the same outcomes are simply not considered.

In an important new book (Failed: What the “Experts” Got Wrong About the Global Economy, Oxford University Press, New York, 2015), Mark Weisbrot calls this bluff effectively and comprehensively. He points out: “Behind almost every prolonged economic malfeasance there is some combination of outworn bad ideas, incompetence and the malign influence of powerful special interests”. Unfortunately, such nightmares are prolonged and even repeated in other places because even if the lessons from one catastrophe are learned, they are typically not learned, or at least not taken to heart, by “the people who call the shots”.

The costs of this failure are huge for the citizenry: for workers who face joblessness or fragile, insecure employment at low wages; for families whose access to essential goods and social services is reduced; for farmers and other small producers who find that their activities are simply not financially viable; for those thrown into poverty because of crisis and instability or those facing greater hunger; and for almost everyone in society when their lives become more insecure in various ways. Many millions of lives across the world have been ruined because of the active implementation of completely wrong and unnecessary economic policies. Yet, because the blame is not apportioned where it is due, those who are culpable for this not only get away with it but are able to continue to impose their power and expertise on economic policies and on governing institutions. For them, there is no price to be paid for failure.

Weisbrot illustrates this with the telling example of the still unfolding economic tragedy in the eurozone. He describes the design flaws in the monetary union that meant that the European Central Bank (ECB) did not behave like a real central bank to all the member-countries because when the crisis broke in 2009-10 it did not behave as a lender of last resort to the countries in the European periphery that faced payment difficulties. Instead, the most draconian austerity measures were imposed on these countries, which simply drove them further into economic decline and made their debt burdens even more burdensome and unpayable.

It took two years for ECB Governor Mario Draghi to promise to “do whatever it takes to save the euro”, and he did this when the crisis threatened to engulf the entire European Union and force the monetary union to collapse. When the financial bleeding was stemmed, it became glaringly evident that the European authorities, and the ECB, could have intervened much earlier to reduce the damage in the eurozone periphery through monetary and fiscal policies. In countries with their own central banks, such as the United States and the United Kingdom, such policies were indeed undertaken, which is why the recovery also came sooner and with less pain than still persists in parts of Europe.

Weisbrot notes that this entire episode should have provided “a historic lesson about the importance of national and democratic control over macroeconomic policy—or at the very least, not ceding such power to the wrong people and institutions”. Unfortunately, the opposite seems to be the case, with the media and others drawing lessons that were very much in terms of blaming the victim. Indeed, Weisbrot makes an even stronger point when he says that this crisis was used by vested interests (including those in the International Monetary Fund, or IMF) to force governments in these countries to implement economic and social reforms that would otherwise be unacceptable to their electorates. 

  1. According to the passage, which among the following is the appropriate theme of the passage?

(a) Effects of imperfect planning of monetary policy by European central bank.
(b) Wrong decisions in economic and social policies leading to financial weakening of European countries.
(c) Declining Economic growth and increasing debt burdens.
(d) Consequences of the implementation of wrong and unnecessary economic policies.
(e) Importance of national and democratic control over macroeconomic policy.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp. “Consequences of the implementation of wrong and unnecessary economic policies” is the appropriate theme as the passage is about the economic policy failures leading to instability in employment generation and material insecurity to the people. Hence option (d) is the right choice.

  1. What does the author mean by the phrase “they let economic policies off the hook”?

(I)There are certain economic establishments that feel that their economic strategies are not under any trouble as these economic slowdown and their subsequent results are beyond their control.

(II)The countries which feel that their economic policies have got nothing to do with their poor economic progress, blame certain inevitable forces outside the system for their economic conundrum.

(III)Those economic forces which feel that their policies and strategies are not the relevant reasons for their negative economic growth also negate the possibilities of any economic intervention as a preventive measure.

(a) Only (I) is true
(b) Only (II) is true
(c) Both (I) and (II) are true
(d) Both (II) and (III) are true
(e) All are true

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp. All the given statements are true as they define the meaning of the phrase as presented by the author.

Directions (3-4): Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in passage.

  1. Draconian

(a) innate

(b) inhibit
(c) stringent
(d) demure
(e) vex

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. Draconian means excessively harsh and severe. Hence it has similar meaning to stringent. Innate means natural.

Inhibit means restrain.

Demure means quiet.

Vex means to confuse or to annoy.

  1. Culpable

(a) serendipity
(b) liable
(c) Rife
(d) nominal
(e) inept

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. Culpable means deserving blame. It is similar to the meaning of liable.

Serendipity means luck.

Rife means abundant or plentiful.

Nominal means insignificant.

Inept means unqualified.

Direction (5): Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in passage.

  1. Proffered

(a) salient
(b) staid
(c) rash
(d) conceal
(e) enmity

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp. Proffered means hold out or put forward (something) to someone for acceptance. Hence it has opposite meaning to conceal.

Enmity means ill-will.

Rash means incautious.

Staid means serious or self-restrained.

Salient means significant.

Direction (6-10): Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is ‘No error’, the answer is (e). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

  1. Don’t talk to (a)/ him, he always (b)/remains in temper (c)/ these days. (d)/ No error (e)

(a) A

(b) B

(c) C

(d) D

(e) E

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. In place of ‘in temper’, use ‘in a temper’ which is idiomatic.

  1. People in Darwin (a)/ had become so accustomed to cyclone warnings (b)/ that few of them paid any attention to the radio warnings (c)/ which began this morning. (d)/ No error (e)

(a) A

(b) B

(c) C

(d) D

(e) E

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp. Sentence is grammatically correct.

  1. This is (a)/ the most important (b)/ question which you have (c)/ to prepare very carefully. (d)/ No error (e)

(a) A

(b) B

(c) C

(d) D

(e) E

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. Use ‘a’ in place of ‘the’. Until there is no comparison between two or more than two persons or things, we don’t use adjective of superlative degree. ‘The most’ is used in superlative degree whereas ‘a most’ is used in positive degree. In such situation, ‘most’ means ‘very’. Ex. (i) You are the most powerful man in this party. (ii) You are a most powerful man. In the first sentence, ‘you’ is compared to other members of the party, whereas in second sentence ‘you’ is not compared to anyone. In this ‘a most’ means ‘a very’.

  1. Brahmaputra is (a)/ one of the longest rivers (b)/ that originate (c)/ in the Himalayas. (d)/ No error (e)

(a) A

(b) B

(c) C

(d) D

(e) E

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp. ‘Brahmaputra’ is the name of a river. Hence ‘The’ will be used before ‘Brahmaputra’.

  1. The trees in a forest (a)/ must be properly counted and numbered (b)/ and proper entries be made (c)/ in the register. (d) / No error. (e)

(a) A

(b) B

(c) C

(d) D

(e) E

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp. Sentence is grammatically correct.

Click here to buy SBI PO Prelims Test Series 

Get Free study material for Bank & Insurance- Download PDF

Recommended PDF’s for 2022:

2022 Preparation Kit PDF

Most important PDF’s for Bank, SSC, Railway and Other Government Exam : Download PDF Now

AATMA-NIRBHAR Series- Static GK/Awareness Practice Ebook PDF Get PDF here
The Banking Awareness 500 MCQs E-book| Bilingual (Hindi + English) Get PDF here
AATMA-NIRBHAR Series- Banking Awareness Practice Ebook PDF Get PDF here
Computer Awareness Capsule 2.O Get PDF here
AATMA-NIRBHAR Series Quantitative Aptitude Topic-Wise PDF 2020 Get PDF here
Memory Based Puzzle E-book | 2016-19 Exams Covered Get PDF here
Caselet Data Interpretation 200 Questions Get PDF here
Puzzle & Seating Arrangement E-Book for BANK PO MAINS (Vol-1) Get PDF here
ARITHMETIC DATA INTERPRETATION 2.O E-book Get PDF here

 

3

Leave a Reply