IBPS Clerk English Language Quiz -13

IBPS Clerk English Language Quiz

English Language is a part of almost all major competitive exams in the country and is perhaps the most scoring section also. Aspirants who regularly practice questions have a good chance of scoring well in the English Language Section. So here we are providing you with the IBPS Clerk English Language Quiz to help you prepare better. This IBPS Clerk English Language Quiz includes all of the most recent pattern-based questions, as well as Previous Year Questions. This IBPS Clerk English Language Quiz is available to you at no cost. Candidates will be provided with a detailed explanation of each question in this IBPS Clerk English Language Quiz. Candidates must practice this IBPS Clerk English Language Quiz to achieve a good score in the English Language Section.

 

Directions (1-5): Five statements are given below, labelled a, b, c, d and e. Among these, four statements are in logical order and form a coherent paragraph. From the given options, choose the option that does not fit into the theme of the paragraph.

  1. (a)This would have sent out a chilling message to the entire film industry.

(b)There is not even a bad provision in the law that bars criticism of the government, whether in newspapers or in films.

(c)Mersal is a pure work of fiction, and if the lead actor got his facts about GST in a twist, this is best left to film critics and the audience to react to.

(d)But the censorship demand of the Tamil Nadu BJP has touched a whole new level of absurdity.

(e)The cynical manipulation of such sections of the law is bad enough.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp. EDBC forms a coherent paragraph as it talks about the various provisions of law related to criticizing government, movies, etc and explains why BJP is creating uproar against the piece of art which is entirely fictional. Read the sentence given in option (a), it has no role to play in this particular paragraph as it talks about an action which should be taken so that a fitting reply could be given to the film fraternity. Hence option (a) is the correct choice.

  1. (a)He is still in detention under the milder Maintenance of Public Order Ordinance and under which bail is obtainable.

(b)This is, in essence, a test of U.S. President Donald Trump’s new South Asia policy, in which he has vowed reprisals if Pakistan fails to take action against all terror groups on its territory, not just those targeting the U.S. in Afghanistan.

(c)Pakistan’s decision to withdraw terror charges against Hafiz Saeed, chief of the Jamaat-ud-Dawa/Lashkar-e-Toiba, is an outrage, and calls into question its professed seriousness to address terrorist violence emanating from its territory.

(d)But last week the government said it was not including charges of terrorism in a new order for his detention.

(e)Saeed, the mastermind of the November 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai, had been detained by the Punjab provincial government in January this year under the Anti-Terrorism Act (ATA).

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. The paragraph is about the change in charges against Hafiz Saeed, chief of the Jamaat-ud-Dawa/Lashkar-e-Toiba who is responsible for the November 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai. CEDA forms a coherent paragraph whereas option (b) has no role to play in this particular paragraph as it talks about the U.S. President Donald Trump’s new South Asia policy, in which he has vowed to take action against Pakistan if it does not take action against all terror groups on its territory. Hence option (b) is the correct choice of elimination.

  1. (a)Its figures for China are now based on two estimates of economic growth—official and alternative (theirs).

(b) The massive amount of credit that is being created has become incrementally inefficient.

(c)The Conference Board, a business lobby and research group in the US, publishes global productivity tables twice a year.

(d)But they have concluded that Western nations are far worse off than them—politically in disarray and economically vulnerable too—and that their relative decline presents them with a “strategic opportunity”.

(e)According to a JP Morgan research note from June, China now needs more credit units per unit of economic growth than it did before the crisis of 2008.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp. The paragraph is about the credit estimate of China and the need to make policies and plan actions as per the results obtained. BECA forms a coherent paragraph. Option (d) doesn’t fit in this sequence as it talks about the economic status of western nations which is nowhere discussed in the remaining statements, and hence is the correct choice for elimination.

  1. (a)Although under Kyrgyz law the state is supposed to provide a free plot of land to every citizen, as Eurasianet notes, “In reality, a land-allocation process thick with corruption and bureaucratic obstacles awaits anyone attempting to claim his share.”

(b)As a result, while elites and those with access to them have acquired more than their fair share of land for housing and construction projects, the majority of the population has been left to fend for themselves, vulnerable to elite power plays and manipulation.

(c)“People are capable of doing really bad things.

(d) Land and housing rights have been a contentious topic in Kyrgyzstan since the country achieved independence following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

(e)This is especially true in and around Bishkek, where prime land is very attractive and expensive due to plot scarcity and services availability.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. The paragraph is about the Kyrgyz law in which the government of Kyrgyzstan is supposed to provide a free plot of land to every citizen while the reality is completely different as the rich and elites have acquired more than their fair share of land for housing and construction projects due to which the majority of the population has been left to fend for themselves. Hence DABE forms a coherent paragraph. Option (c) doesn’t fit in this sequence as it talks about the capability of people in doing wrong things which is completely ambiguous and doesn’t explicitly refer to anything, and hence is the correct choice for elimination.

  1. (a)The tea industry, for example, lost almost all its second flush crop, with losses estimated at ₹400 crore and counting.

(b)It has issued an arrest warrant against Mr. Gurung and declared him a “proclaimed offender”.

(c)The economy of the Darjeeling hills has taken a severe hit with both the tea and tourism industries having suffered huge losses and struggling to chart a way out.

(d)With uncertainty prevailing in the hills and winter setting in, there is anxiety over whether the gardens will be ready for the premium first flush crop which is harvested between February and April.

(e)With peace yet to be restored fully, the Central and State governments need to urgently sink their differences, hold tripartite talks and meaningfully empower the GTA.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. ECAD forms a coherent paragraph as it talks about the unrest prevailing in Darjeeling for such a long time and the losses incurred due to the existing situation. The paragraph tells the need to sink the differences between the Central and State governments and hold tripartite talks to resolve the issues as it is causing a huge loss to the economy of the state and might continue to affect in future. Read the sentence given in option (b) it has no role to play in this particular paragraph as it talks about an arrest warrant issued against a person named Mr. Gurung and the need to declare him an offender, hence is the correct choice for elimination.

Directions (6 – 10): Read the following passage carefully and certain words in the passage are printed in bold letters to help you locate them easily while answering some of these questions.

One of the most infamous cold cases in Los Angeles crime history began with a hole in Hollywood. In June 1986, employees of the First Interstate Bank at Spaulding Avenue and Sunset Boulevard opened their vault to discover dozens of emptied safety deposit boxes encircling a fresh, 500-square-inch tear in the floor. As retired FBI agent William Rehder recounts in his 2003 memoir ‘Where the Money Is’, investigators on the scene “had never seen anything like this.  We had a bona fide caper on our hands.” In proper Hollywood fashion, the police and media bestowed upon the suspects a cinematically appropriate moniker: the Hole in the Ground Gang. The gang tried their luck twice more over the next year, also tunneling from below, but both times, they were scared off before they could properly empty their targets. All in all, the gang netted a little over $2.5 million in cash and goods and more impressively, they were never caught.

For Geoff Manaugh, author of the new ‘A Burglar’s Guide to the City’, it’s not the gang’s spoils or fate he’s interested in but their methods; how they used the city’s storm sewer system to drive compact Suzuki 4x4s to and from their excavation site where they drilled through 100-plus feet of soil and concrete to reach the vaults. The city’s sewer tunnels were never, of course, built with recreational sports vehicles in mind, let alone to create a subterranean drive-through for robbers seeking unauthorized bank withdrawals. However, by exploiting the city’s infrastructure in unforeseen ways, Manaugh suggests that the Hole in the Ground Gang created a “topology pursued by other means,” one that opens up “a new science of the city” in which “shortcuts, splices, and wormholes” reshape our understanding of the built environment.

Though A Burglar’s Guide to the City is filled with other colorful exploits, it’s far less a handbook for would-be thieves and instead uses their craft as a springboard into a heady series of interrogations of urban design and architecture. For Manaugh, the burglar may be a morally dubious figure who undermines our “very idea of personal space and dignity,” but he also admires how burglary activates a different awareness of space, exposing the hidden vulnerabilities within well-intended blueprints and master plans. Los Angeles, for example, became known as the bank robbery capital of the United States not only because we have a multitude of banks, but also because so many of them were located near freeways which gave robbers a fast break to escape. Or consider Bill Mason, an ex-burglar Manaugh profiles, who became so adept at deciphering municipal building codes that he could mentally construct the layout of an apartment simply by scanning the placement of exterior fire escapes. As such, Manaugh concludes that, “It is burglars and police, not architects or urban planners, who most readily and consistently show us ……. these other routes and spaces hidden in some unrealized dimension of the metropolis.” To put it even more simply, he writes, “burglars use cities better.”

Manaugh mixes pithy prose — and occasional dabs of purple — to wax philosophically about how “[b]urglary is the original sin of the metropolis …….. a deviant counternarrative as old as the built environment itself.” As he repeatedly reminds us, “burglary requires architecture” since the main thing that defines it isn’t the loss of goods but rather, an incursion into physical space. Few other crimes have such an explicitly spatial component, leading attorney Minturn Wright III to write in a 1951 legal critique that burglary mostly exists as a legal category thanks to “the magic of four walls.” For these reasons, Manaugh elevates burglars above petty criminal status and instead, characterizes them as “drunk Jedis of architectural space,”, “dark wizards of cities and buildings,” and “stowaways of the metropolis, hidden deliberately in the shadows.”

A Burglar’s Guide to the City is bestrewn with similar, entertaining turns of phrase but as a whole, its structure is ironically (appropriately?) labyrinthine, filled with tangential side passages and discursive stairways that don’t necessarily lead anywhere specific. Besides the aforementioned profiles of real-life burglars there are also long discussions of surveillance technology and fake “capture houses” that law enforcement uses to entrap thieves. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to pick locks or escape from a wrist tie, Manaugh shares his experiences with both. Your favorite heist flick is likely to get at least passing mention, if not several thousand words, assuming that film is Die Hard, which he praises as “a film about the misuse of architecture.” Manaugh is inherently excited at nonlinear explorations of space, and he clearly applies those same principles to writing the book itself.

  1. According to the given passage, what is the area of interest of the author of ‘A Burglar’s Guide to the City’?

(a) How they used the city’s storm sewer system to drive compact Suzuki 4x4s to and from their excavation site.

(b) How the city’s storm sewer system to drive compact Suzuki 4x4s.

(c) How exploiting the city’s infrastructure was exploited in unforeseen ways.

(d) The method they (Burglar’s) adopted to conclude the robbery.

(e) Not given in the passage

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp.  It is given in second paragraph  that ‘‘A Burglar’s Guide to the City’, it’s not the gang’s spoils or fate he’s interested in but their methods’ from this we can easily conclude that (d) is the most appropriate option.

Directions (7-8): Choose the word/group of words which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. MEMOIR

(a) Account

(b) Fiction

(c) Thriller

(d) Ballad

(e) Novel

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp.  ‘Memoir’ means ‘a historical account or biography written from personal knowledge.’. Hence ‘Account’ is the word which is most similar in meaning to it.

  1. SUBTERRANEAN

(a) Suburban

(b) urbane

(c) Underground

(d) agrarian

(e) Samaritan

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. ‘Subterranean’ means ‘existing, occurring, or done under the earth’s surface.’. Hence ‘Underground’ is the word which is most similar in meaning to it.

Directions (9-10): Choose the word/group of words which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning of the word/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. EXPLICITLY

(a) Surely

(b) Absolutely

(c) Finally

(d) Plainly

(e) Ambiguously

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp.  ‘Explicitly’ means ‘clearly and exactly’. Hence ‘Ambiguously’ is the word which is most opposite in meaning to it.

  1. BESTREWN

(a) Broadcast

(b) Uncovered

(c) Dispersed

(d) Disturbed

(e) Buried

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp.  ‘Bestrewn’ means ‘to lie covering a surface, or to cover a surface with things that are far apart and in no particular arrangement’. Hence ‘Uncovered’ is the word which is most opposite in meaning to it.

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