IBPS PO Pre English Language Quiz – 1

IBPS PO Pre English Language Quiz

English Language is a part of almost all major competitive exams in the country and is perhaps the most scoring section also. Aspirants who regularly practice questions have a good chance of scoring well in the English Language Section. So here we are providing you with the IBPS PO Pre English Language Quiz to help you prepare better. This IBPS PO Pre English Language Quiz includes all of the most recent pattern-based questions, as well as Previous Year Questions. This IBPS PO Pre Pre English Language Quiz is available to you at no cost. Candidates will be provided with a detailed explanation of each question in this IBPS PO Pre English Language Quiz. Candidates must practice this IBPS PO Pre English Language Quiz to achieve a good score in the English Language Section.

 

Directions (1-3): In each of the questions given below three sentences are given which may or may not be grammatically or contextually correct. Find the sentences which is/are grammatically or contextually incorrect. If all the sentences are grammatically incorrect choose option (e) as your choice.

 

1.

(i) If I was told earlier I would have certainly helped you.

(ii) Leaning on tradition and culture to justify the practice does not carry any conviction.

(iii) No sooner did the teacher enter the class when the students stood up.

(a) Only (i)

(b) Both (i) and (iii)

(c) Both (i) and (ii)
(d) Both (ii) and (iii)
(e) All are incorrect.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp.

(i) – Use ‘had been told’ in place of ‘was told’ because the use of ‘earlier’ represents past time and for unreal situation of past clause we use this:

IF + SUBJECT + HAD +V3

(iii) Use ‘than’ in place of ‘when’ as after ‘No sooner’ the conjunction we use is ‘than’.

2.

(i) The company is negotiating new store launches at nearly half the rent.

(ii) Intense fear blocks both to the generation and expression.
(iii) The challenge of decentralization and distributed management is affecting other utilities as well.

(a) Only (i)

(b) Both (i) and (iii)

(c) Only (ii)
(d) Both (ii) and (iii)
(e) All are incorrect

Answer & Explanation
Ans. c

Exp. Only (ii) is grammatically incorrect.

(ii)- ‘to’ will not be used after ‘both’ as block is a ‘transitive verb’ which directly takes the object.

3.

(i) Since we are living in Bangalore for five years, we are reluctant to move to another city.

(ii) No sooner has she agreed to marry him than she started having terrible doubts.

(iii) The increasing mechanization of life have led us farther away from daily contact with nature and the crafts of the farm.

(a) Only (i)

(b) Both (i) and (iii)

(c) Only (ii)
(d) Both (ii) and (iii)
(e) All are incorrect

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp. (i) Use ‘since we have been living’ instead of ‘Since we are living’ because of the use of ‘for five years’ as ‘for/since+ time’ is generally used in present continuous tense.

(ii)- Generally following structure is used:

‘No sooner+ did+ subject+ verb’

Or

‘No sooner+ had + subject+ verb’

Therefore ‘No sooner had she agreed’ will be used in place of ‘No sooner has she agreed’

(iii)- Use ‘has’ in place of ‘have’ as the subject of the sentence “The increasing mechanization” is singular and therefore singular verb is required.

Directions (4- 10): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below them. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

The Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) is the first multilateral treaty to regulate the international trade in conventional arms. In this respect, it is a landmark treaty for the international community, focusing on an issue that is of highest importance for many Asia-Pacific countries – trying to find and establish mechanisms to control unregulated flows of arms. Since its entry into force on December 24, 2014, 130 states have signed the treaty and so far 92 became State Parties. However, when looking at the regional divide of ratifications and accessions on a world-wide scale, the Asia-Pacific shows by far the lowest numbers in global comparison. The past years didn’t result in much progress; efforts to tighten arms transfer controls in the region seem to be at a stalemate. What is the reason for this inactivity, given so many countries in the region face significant small arms proliferation problems which pose threats to both national and regional security? Which incentives could help to pave the way for this new security and counter-terrorism tool to take full effect?

The ATT is to be seen in the greater scope of what is commonly known as export control, or, more positively connoted, Strategic Trade Control (STC). The main security-enhancing effect of the treaty is to be found in the requirement to introduce comprehensive control systems to make sure that exports, imports, transits, and transshipments of conventional weapons will not be diverted and end up in the hands of illicit actors. Thus, the ATT can serve as another instrument inside the global anti-terrorism toolbox. The treaty scope requires states to introduce legislation and establish comprehensive control systems to perform case-by-case risk assessments. To do so, states must have competent national licensing authorities that check relevant control lists of military items. Questions of the end-use and the end-user of weapons shipments are thus essential for such authorities to consider when reviewing applications for arms transfer licenses. Possible cases when a license must be denied include those where arms might end up in situations where crimes against humanity occur.

Comparing the Asia-Pacific to other developing regions, such as Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa, it becomes obvious that acceptance and popularity of the ATT has progressed rather slowly. Up to date the number of ATT ratifications within the Asia-Pacific remains at an absolute low of only six out of 53 countries. In Oceania, these supporters are Australia, New Zealand, Tuvalu, and Samoa. It is within the Pacific Islands where one can see probably the most forward movement in putting the ATT in practice on a regional basis. This is mainly due to the work of the Pacific Island Forum Secretariat, with the help of the government of New Zealand.  The Secretariat published an ATT blueprint legislation in an effort to support the Pacific states in their ambitions to ratify and implement the treaty framework. Amongst its 18 member countries, ratifications by Tuvalu, Samoa, and signatures to the treaty by Kiribati, Nauru, and Palau prove these regional efforts to be at least partly successful. Australia and New Zealand as strong ATT supporters also played a major role in these efforts to make ATT gain momentum in the region.

In eastern Asia, Japan and South Korea are the sole active supporters of the treaty. For many years, South Korea has viewed STC as an important security instrument, mainly preventing North Korea from acquiring products that may add to its conventional and unconventional weapons arsenal. After the Tokyo subway sarin gas attack in 1995, Japanese authorities started to give the overall topic of STC ever more emphasis and also began to promote the goal of establishing a tight regional network of sensitive items controls amongst their neighbors. For both countries, ratifying and implementing the ATT was an easy and logical next step that fit in their overall security strategy.

  1. According to the passage, How Arms Trade Treaty can be referred as Strategic Trade Control?

(a) The Arms Trade Treaty ensures the tightening of the exports, imports, transits and transshipments of conventional weapons controls.
(b) The Arms Trade treaty ensures the national and regional security.

(c) The Arms Trade Treaty is introduced to ensure that the haulage of the weapons will not fulfill some illegal purpose.
(d) Both (a) and (c)
(e) All are correct.

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp. We can infer from the passage that Arms trade Treaty is ratified to regulate the international trade in conventional arms, ensuring national and regional security and serving as an anti-terrorism toolbox. Hence all the given sentences are correct.

  1. Which of the following cannot be inferred from the passage?

(a) There are many countries which face small arms proliferation problems posing threat to national and regional security.
(b) The purpose and success of the treaty made many other countries to join this agreement.
(c) Arms Trade Treaty is a multilateral treaty in which there are 92 State Parties.
(d) The Arms Trade Treaty is signed among the countries to control unregulated flows of arms and hence ensuring national security.
(e) All the sentences are correct

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. Referring the first paragraph of the passage, we can infer that sentence (b) cannot be inferred from the passage. “The past years didn’t result in much progress; efforts to tighten arms transfer controls in the region seem to be at a stalemate.”

  1. According to the passage, how can the purpose of the arms trade treaty be fulfilled?

(I) By issuing limited number of arms for avoiding illegal use.
(II) By keeping check on the control lists of military items that were transported.
(III)The purpose can be fulfilled by evaluating the risks.

(a) Only (I) is correct
(b) Only (II) is correct
(c) Both (I) and (III) are correct
(d) Both (II) and (III) are correct
(e) All ae correct

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp. Refer the last few lines of the second paragraph “The treaty scope requires states to introduce legislation and establish comprehensive control systems to perform case-by-case risk assessments. To do so, states must have competent national licensing authorities that check relevant control lists of military items.”

Direction (7-8): Choose the word which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. Stalemate

(a) evitable
(b) impasse
(c) regulation
(d) edict
(e) precept

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. Stalemate means a situation in which further action or progress by opposing or competing parties seems impossible. Hence it has similar meaning as ‘impasse’.

  1. Connoted

(a) implied
(b) interdicted
(c) confiscate
(d) procure
(e) seize

Answer & Explanation
Ans. a

Exp. Connoted means imply or suggest (an idea or feeling) in addition to the literal or primary meaning. Hence it has same meaning as ‘implied’.

Direction (9- 10): Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. Illicit

(a) rupture
(b) munificent
(c) arrogate
(d) collocate
(e) authorised

Answer & Explanation
Ans. e

Exp. Illicit means forbidden by law, rules, or custom. Hence it has opposite meaning as ‘authorised’.

  1. Acquiring

(a) cessation
(b) forfeit
(c) divulge
(d) conceal
(e) acquaint

Answer & Explanation
Ans. b

Exp. Acquiring means buy or obtain (an asset or object) for oneself. Hence it has opposite meaning as ‘forfeit’.

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