SBI PO Mains English Language Quiz – 3

SBI PO Mains English Language Quiz

Aspirants have a strong possibility of scoring well in the English Language section if they practice quality questions on a regular basis. This section takes the least amount of time if the practice is done every day in a dedicated manner. In this article, we have come up with the SBI PO Mains English Language Quiz to help you prepare better. Candidates will be provided with a detailed explanation for each question in this SBI Clerk Mains English Language Quiz. This SBI PO Mains English Language Quiz includes a variety of questions ranging in difficulty from easy to tough. This SBI PO Mains English Language Quiz is totally FREE. This SBI PO Mains English Language Quiz has important English Language Questions and Answers that will help you improve your exam score. Aspirants must practice this SBI PO Mains English Language Quiz in order to be able to answer questions quickly and efficiently in upcoming exams.

Directions (1-7): Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases have been given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

A major feature of the global food security scenario is that marked imbalances exist across regions. For instance, in 1985-86 there was a global surplus in cereal production of 92 million metric tonnes. Developed nations had a surplus of 182 million tonnes, while the developing countries and the socialist block had a deficit of 90 million tonnes. The estimated incidence of chronic malnutrition for 1985 was anywhere between 500 and 720 million people. This figure excludes China, for want of data. South Asia with about two-thirds of the undernourished and sub-Saharan Africa with one-fifth, account for nearly 80 per cent of the world’s total. This highly skewed profile of food insecurity across the major regions of the world shows little change over recent years. Any worthwhile contemporary discussion on food security must therefore have as its major focus the situation in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.

Alongside the regional differences in levels of food insecurity, within the vulnerable regions the causes of this condition also vary considerably. In certain countries, of which India is an example, the poor are largely net buyers of food. What is needed in this context are steps to increase domestic supplies and stabilize prices at reasonable levels. Policies are needed to promote food production to serve the public distribution system. In the other hand, in countries like Bangladesh, the majority of the poor are in fact net sellers of food. Security for them can be achieved by raising the prices of food grains and expanding markets mainlythrough increased export.An improved marketing system is relevant here. Another source of problems regarding food security lies in structural factors like lack of infrastructure for transporting food grains and their storage. The transport problem is acute in landlocked countries like Chad, Mali, Niger and Zimbabwe. This has led to considerable damage and wastage, and this includes imported food grains.

The problem of food insecurity over the globe has a distributing long-term aspect, namely the growing import needs of the developing countries. In over just six years following 1972, their imports rose from around 50 to over 70 million tonnes. There is also evidence that the annual growth rates for food production are negative for most low income countries. Given that food grain prices are likely to increase following the Uruguay Round (UR) of GAIT. This growing dependence on non-domestic sourcespoints only to a worsening situation. A short-term aspect of food insecurity lies in inter-year fluctuations in the availability of food supplies. Many factors operate together. A fall in production cannot be offset readily by imports because of foreign exchange restrictions, and a reduction in food exports is disallowed by existing contracts. The option of curtailing non-food imports while logically sound, is problematic because these imports usually cover items needed for sustaining ongoing development. Thus, there is a trade-off between current food security and growth. Food aid becomes an important mechanism under these circumstances.Indeed, figures show increased food aid over the decade after 1978. A limitation of this mechanism is that aid made available by donors generally does not respond to the specific needs of the individual countries targeted.

  1. The writer cites the large cereal surplus in developed countries in order to

(a) illustrate the extent of exploration in the present world order.

(b) show how efficient modern agricultural practices can be.

(c) show that there will be a world level surplus even after meeting the deficits of poorer countries.

(d) highlight the marked imbalances across regions of the world in food security.

(e) argue that this quantum is actually small compared with the massive figures for malnutrition.

Answer & Explanation
Ans.(d)

Sol. Refer to the first sentence of the passage, “A major feature of the global food security scenario is that marked imbalances exist across regions. For instance, in 1985-86 there was a global surplus in cereal production of 92 million metric tonnes. Developed nations had a surplus of 182 million tonnes, while the developing countries and the socialist block had a deficit of 90 million tonnes.” Hence option (d) is correct.

  1. The important observation made in relation to South Asia and Sub Saharan Africa is that

(a) these regions have the highest levels of individual malnutrition and child mortality.

(b) a direct comparison between these regions and China would not be valid without more data.

(c) an effective solution to global food insecurity must be linked to their needs.

(d) they must be given priority assistance to reduce their dependence on costly food imports.

(e) their position on the ‘map’ of malnutrition across major regions remain unusually stable.

Answer & Explanation
Ans.(e)

Sol. Refer to the last three sentence of the first paragraph of the passage, “South Asia with about two-thirds of the undernourished and sub-Saharan Africa with one-fifth, account for nearly 80 per cent of the world’s total. This highly skewed profile of food insecurity across the major regions of the world shows little change over recent years. Any worthwhile contemporary discussion on food security must therefore have as its major focus the situation in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.” Hence option (e) is true.

  1. The significant difference between the group of countries represented by India and Bangladesh lies in

(a) the urban-rural population ratio.

(b) the level of dependence on imports for maintaining buffer stocks.

(c) the vulnerability of the rural population to the effects of high food prices.

(d) the importance of the functions of trading communities and castes to the rural economy.

(e) the proportion of small and marginal farmers who produce some surplus food.

Answer & Explanation
Ans.(c)

Sol. Refer to the first few lines of the second paragraph of the passage, “Alongside the regional differences in levels of food insecurity, within the vulnerable regions the causes of this condition also vary considerably. In certain countries, of which India is an example, the poor are largely net buyers of food. What is needed in this context are steps to increase domestic supplies and stabilize prices at reasonable levels. Policies are needed to promote food production to serve the public distribution system. In the other hand, in countries like Bangladesh, the majority of the poor are in fact net sellers of food.” Hence option (c) is true.

  1. Chad and Mali are examples of countries where

(a) transportation facilities can be maintained only with heavy technical and financial outlays.

(b) lack of infrastructure leads to a deadlock in the food distribution system.

(c) inadequate transport and storage facilities lead to wastage of food supplies.

(d)the costs of transport and storage effectively neutralise the value of the significant food aid.

(e) infrastructure deficiencies rather than low domestic production is at the base of food insecurity.

Answer & Explanation
Ans.(c)

Sol. Refer to the eighth sentence of the second paragraph of the passage, “Another source of problems regarding food security lies in structural factors like lack of infrastructure for transporting food grains and their storage. The transport problem is acute in landlocked countries like Chad, Mali, Niger and Zimbabwe. This has led to considerable damage and wastage, and this includes imported food grains.” Hence option (c) is true.

  1. The long term dimension of the food insecurity problem of the poor countries is

(a) the tendency to rely on cheap imports and aid rather than invest in infrastructure.

(b) the likely increase ingrain prices following the UR of GATT.

(c) the negative growth rate for food supplies that shows signs of stabilizing.

(d) the need to maintain exports at high levels even when earnings are falling.

(e) the increasing dependence on food imports of many developing countries.

Answer & Explanation
Ans.(e)

Sol. Refer to the eleventh sentence of the second paragraph, “The problem of food insecurity over the globe has a distributing long-term aspect, namely the growing import needs of the developing countries.” Hence option (e) is true.

  1. The option of reducing non-food imports when short term food shortages arise is often not practical because

(a) there is a trade-off between food security and growth of GNP.

(b) the conventional methods of containing insecurity are too expensive.

(c) such imports are necessary to sustain ongoing development efforts.

(d) curtailing imports arbitrarily goes against the UR agreements .

(e) dumping of surplus supply by the exporting nations so affected can cause even more difficulties.

Answer & Explanation
Ans.(c)

Sol. Refer to the fifth last sentence of the passage,  “The option of curtailing non-food imports while logically sound, is problematic because these imports usually cover items needed for sustaining ongoing development.” Hence option (c) is true.

  1. While food aid has increased over the 1980s,

(a) it remains a mechanism that can be misused by wealthy nations.

(b) it has not been effective in controlling price rise after the UR.

(c) it is not usually sensitive to the specific needs of the countries being targeted.

(d) its potentially key role in mediating between food security and growth has yet to be activated.

(e)under certain circumstances it cannot sustain ongoing development.

Answer & Explanation
Ans.(c)

Sol. Refer to the last three sentences of the passage, “Food aid becomes an important mechanism under these circumstances. Indeed, figures show increased food aid over the decade after 1978. A limitation of this mechanism is that aid made available by donors generally does not respond to the specific needs of the individual countries targeted.” Hence option (c) is true.

Directions (8-10): In each of the following sentence there are three blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five options and each option consists of three words which can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence to make the sentence grammatically correct.

 

  1. __________ the India Meteorological Department _________ its monsoon forecast wrong this year, its modelling has __________ come under the spotlight.

(a) along, taking, questionably
(b) by, rejecting, primarily
(c) of, acquiring, imperatively
(d) with, getting, necessarily
(e) over, reaching, importantly

Answer & Explanation
Ans. (d)

Sol. ‘with, getting, necessarily’ is the correct set words making the sentence meaningful.

 

  1. The fallout of _________ on numbers to gauge a phenomenon as geographically and quantitatively ________ as the Indian monsoon is that it has ripple effects of tricking everyone from policymakers to the stock markets that a ‘normal’ monsoon _________ all will be well with rainfall distribution.

(a) consolidating, blended, justifies
(b) focusing, varied, implies
(c) purposing, variegated, divulges
(d) incorporating, differed, contends
(e) regulating, diversed, explicates

Answer & Explanation
Ans.(b)

Sol. ‘focusing, varied, implies’ is the correct set words making the sentence meaningful.

Variegated means marked by variety.

Explicates means analyse and develop.

Contends means struggle to surmount.

 

  1. While the injury did alter Gage’s personality and ____________, it also underscored the brain’s ability and flexibility, or plasticity, to ____________ accidents and function.

(a) understanding, illustrate

(b) thoughts, demonstrate

(c) nature, occur

(d) behaviour, survive

(e) None of these

Answer & Explanation
Ans. d

Exp. The most suitable combination of words to fill the blanks is “behaviour, survive” which provides the precise contextual meaning to the sentence. Hence, option (d) is the most viable answer choice.

Illustrate means explain or make (something) clear by using examples, charts, pictures, etc.

Demonstrate means clearly show the existence or truth of (something) by giving proof or evidence.

 

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